Newsroom
Friss Hírek
Project
Tervezet
Folklore
Folklór
Genealogy
Genealógia
 
  HIR HAL Lists HAN Events HAL Folklór AHM AHFC Honosítás / Dual Citizenship
   HUNGARY

> Hun / Székely Írásmód
> Csángó Magyarok
> Mohácsi vész / Turkish conquest
> King Lajos II
> St. Piroska
> 1956 Hungarian Revolution
> Revolution '06
> Dr. Ilona Tóth '56 martyr

> Ady Endre
> Áprily Lajos
> Arany János
> Babits Mihály
> Balassi Bálint
> Baróti Szabó Dávid
> Bartis Ferenc
> Berzsenyi Dániel
> Eötvös József
> Illyés Gyula
> József Attila
> Kányádi Sándor:
> Kárpáti Piroska
> KOCSIS GÁBOR
> Komjáthy Jenő
> Korondi F. János
> Petőfi Sándor
> Radnóti Miklós
> Radnóti miklós
> Reményik Sándor
> Szentmihályi Szabó Péter
> Tompa László
> Tóth Árpád
> Többi
> Vörösmarty Mihály
> Wass Albert
> Weöres Sándor


   HALists/MAListák

Topics - Témakörök

E-mail Address:
Real name:
go
   Related


2017 Augusztus 22 (Kedd) - Menyhért, Mirjam névnapja Search for: in

Content of this page:
    Ferenc Rákóczi and Imre Thököly-led insurrection
    Kuruc Freedom Fighter Anniversary
    Nemzetünkért öszvefogván…

Ferenc Rákóczi and Imre Thököly-led insurrection

Ferenc Rákóczi  II (1676-1735)
Ferenc Rákóczi II (1676-1735)

300th anniversary (in 2003) of the outbreak of the Ferenc Rákóczi and Imre Thököly-led insurrection which broke out in 1703 and ended sadly with the capitulation of the Hungarians in 1711 and the exile of Rákóczi and his followers to Turkey.

Ferenc Rákóczi II (1676-1735) lived in turbulent times. His father, Ferenc Rákóczi I (1645-1676) had held the lofty position of lifelong Prince (Fejedelem) of Transylvania, but the Turks deprived him of his throne. He had married Ilona Zrínyi of another illustrious noble Hungarian family and became involved in the Zrínyi-Frangepan conspiracy against the ruling Habsburgs. He was caught and Ilona had to pay his ransom, but he died, leaving two children, Julianna who eventually married the Italian Prince Aspremonte, and Ferenc II, who, aged 12, after ceding Munkács Castle was interred with his mother and sister in Vienna. The Habsburg Emperor Leopold took Ferenc as his ward, but in 1692 he escaped, returning to his family nest in Transylvania.

Touched by the desperation of the Hungarians suffering from Austrian oppression, in 1700 Rákóczi appealed to King Louis XIV of France, who provided him with arms and funds to mount his revolution. Unfortunately, the Austrians got wind of this and took him prisoner. Rákóczi escaped to Poland and it was from there that he, with 3,000 Hungarian kuruc soldiers, proceeded to march to the Danube, capturing the people’s hearts and their loyalty in the territories along the way. In 1707 Louis XIV urged Parliament to cast out the Habsburg House, declaring them illegitimate, but this was not enough to guarantee Rákóczi’s power.

The Hungarian military proved insufficient against the Austrians and Rákóczi was forced into exile. The brave kuruc troops laid down their arms in 1711 and the Hungarians signed the ignominious peace agreement at Szatmár. In 1715, from his exile in Turkey, Rákóczi attempted to mount another insurrection against the Habsburgs, but the Turks prevented his renewed actions to incite revolt.

During the long years of exile, Rákóczi and his sizeable retinue of loyal Hungarians lived in the town of Rodostó on the coast of the Sea of Maromora in Turkey, where the distinct quarter with its "Hungarian Houses" bears witness to their illustrious inhabitants of three centuries ago. Unfortunately, the wooden houses are in bad repair. The house of Rákóczi’s general, Miklós Bercsényi, has already collapsed and the remains have been removed (see N Kósa Judit, Bercsényi házát mar elbontották, Népszabadság, Kultura section, January 29, 2003).

Rákóczi’s Hungarian tutor Kelemen Mikes (1692-1762) followed the great leader into exile and in his famous Letters from Turkey recorded the life of Rákóczi’s Hungarian retinue. Mikes’s writings are now being re-examined, edited and published. Mikes, who never married, remained practically alone in Rodostó after Rákóczi’s death in 1735 and died of the plague aged 70. His poignant lines, "Where shall I go - at least here I can hear the ocean’s mighty roar, where Rákóczi’s great spirit lies in final peace," are often quoted.

Through the centuries, the cult of Rákóczi grew. In 1906 the writer and politician Kálmán Thaly (1839-1909) succeeded in bringing Rákóczi’s remains home to Hungary. With great pomp, Rákóczi’s and Thököly’s bones were laid to rest in a special crypt in the Dom (cathedral) in Kassa in Upper Hungary (now Kosice in Slovakia).

There are numerous institutions and associations named for the legendary leader. The Rodostó Alapítvány (foundation) is today the principal activist in attempts to rescue the Hungarian houses in Turkey in order to preserve this shrine to these earliest of Hungarian freedom fighters.

 <  home top  /\ 

Kuruc Freedom Fighter Anniversary

Ferenc Rákóczi, who with his kuruc troops led the first concerted revolt to free Hungary from Habsburg domination back in the early XVIIIth century.

300th anniversary (in 2003) of the outbreak of the Ferenc Rákóczi and Imre Thököly-led insurrection which broke out in 1703 and ended sadly with the capitulation of the Hungarians in 1711 and the exile of Rákóczi and his followers to Turkey.

Ferenc Rákóczi II (1676-1735) lived in turbulent times. His father, Ferenc Rákóczi I (1645-1676) had held the lofty position of lifelong Prince (Fejedelem) of Transylvania, but the Turks deprived him of his throne. He had married Ilona Zrínyi of another illustrious noble Hungarian family and became involved in the Zrínyi-Frangepan conspiracy against the ruling Habsburgs. He was caught and Ilona had to pay his ransom, but he died, leaving two children, Julianna who eventually married the Italian Prince Aspremonte, and Ferenc II, who, aged 12, after ceding Munkács Castle was interred with his mother and sister in Vienna. The Habsburg Emperor Leopold took Ferenc as his ward, but in 1692 he escaped, returning to his family nest in Transylvania.

Touched by the desperation of the Hungarians suffering from Austrian oppression, in 1700 Rákóczi appealed to King Louis XIV of France, who provided him with arms and funds to mount his revolution. Unfortunately, the Austrians got wind of this and took him prisoner. Rákóczi escaped to Poland and it was from there that he, with 3,000 Hungarian kuruc soldiers, proceeded to march to the Danube, capturing the people’s hearts and their loyalty in the territories along the way. In 1707 Louis XIV urged Parliament to cast out the Habsburg House, declaring them illegitimate, but this was not enough to guarantee Rákóczi’s power.

The Hungarian military proved insufficient against the Austrians and Rákóczi was forced into exile. The brave kuruc troops laid down their arms in 1711 and the Hungarians signed the ignominious peace agreement at Szatmár. In 1715, from his exile in Turkey, Rákóczi attempted to mount another insurrection against the Habsburgs, but the Turks prevented his renewed actions to incite revolt.

During the long years of exile, Rákóczi and his sizeable retinue of loyal Hungarians lived in the town of Rodostó on the coast of the Sea of Maromora in Turkey, where the distinct quarter with its "Hungarian Houses" bears witness to their illustrious inhabitants of three centuries ago. Unfortunately, the wooden houses are in bad repair. The house of Rákóczi’s general, Miklós Bercsényi, has already collapsed and the remains have been removed (see N Kósa Judit, Bercsényi házát mar elbontották, Népszabadság, Kultura section, January 29, 2003).

Rákóczi’s Hungarian tutor Kelemen Mikes (1692-1762) followed the great leader into exile and in his famous Letters from Turkey recorded the life of Rákóczi’s Hungarian retinue. Mikes’s writings are now being re-examined, edited and published. Mikes, who never married, remained practically alone in Rodostó after Rákóczi’s death in 1735 and died of the plague aged 70. His poignant lines, "Where shall I go - at least here I can hear the ocean’s mighty roar, where Rákóczi’s great spirit lies in final peace," are often quoted.

Through the centuries, the cult of Rákóczi grew. In 1906 the writer and politician Kálmán Thaly (1839-1909) succeeded in bringing Rákóczi’s remains home to Hungary. With great pomp, Rákóczi’s and Thököly’s bones were laid to rest in a special crypt in the Dom (cathedral) in Kassa in Upper Hungary (now Kosice in Slovakia).

There are numerous institutions and associations named for the legendary leader. The Rodostó Alapítvány (foundation) is today the principal activist in attempts to rescue the Hungarian houses in Turkey in order to preserve this shrine to these earliest of Hungarian freedom fighters.

 <  home top  /\ 

Nemzetünkért öszvefogván…

Rákóczi-portréja (Mányoki Ádám)
Rákóczi-portréja (Mányoki Ádám)

http://www.szfo.hu/index.mno?cikk=5634&rvt=7&rvt2=27
„Nemzetünkért öszvefogván…”
2003. május 30. 0:00

Lovass Ildikó

A Rákóczi-szabadságharc kezdetének háromszázadik évfordulójára emlékkiállítás nyílt a Magyar Nemnzeti Múzeumban. A „Nemzetünkért öszvefogván…” című tárlat egyaránt tiszteleg a kuruc hadak vezetői, harcosai és a nagyságos fejedelem előtt.

A XVIII. század elején majd’ egy évtizedig tartó szabadságharc vezetője, II. Rákóczi Ferenc előkelő fejedelmi családban született, felmenői között három főúri família – Rákóczi, Zrínyi, Báthory – anyagi, politikai és szellemi örökségét, nemzetközi tekintélyét is magáénak mondhatta.
Nagyanyja, Báthory Zsófia síremléke, anyja, Zrínyi Ilona, nevelőapja, Thököly Imre korabeli portréi, fegyverek, a munkácsi templom harangja, címeres ágyúcsőtöredék mellett a gyermek Rákóczit megörökítő olajfestmények is ott sorakoznak a látnivalók között. A kis Ferkó irkafirkáit és első aláírását őrzi 1674-es ábécéskönyve. Zrínyi Ilona saját kezű másolatában maradt fenn két gyermeke, Júlia és Ferenc édesanyjuk névnapjára írt köszöntő verse: „Két pelikán fiát szárnyaival fedezte. / Szempillantás nem volt, szemeivel nézte, / Hogy vagy egyikének ne legyen eleste, / Kevéssel távozván: azonnal kereste. / Mélység bilincseit kerülő magyarság, / Egy Munkács várában szorult az szabadság. / Kit egy Zrínyi-szívű tartott meg asszonyság, / Hol vagy s hálát nem adsz az egész magyarság.”
A munkácsi vár ostromát gyerekként átélő Rákóczit hiába nevelte később a bécsi udvarban Kollonich Lipót érsek, nem sikerült belőle lojális alattvalót faragnia. Családi öröksége, a forradalmi lelkület és a nemzeti összefogás iránti elkötelezettség mélyen gyökerezett benne. Bár az 1797-es hegyaljai felkelés elől még Bécsbe menekült, majd később a bécsújhelyi börtönből Lengyelországba szökött, várta az alkalmat, hogy a magyarországi Habsburg-ellenes erők élére állhasson. Kívül-belül sokat változott, míg a szabadságharc vezérévé érett. Az utókor leginkább Mányoki Ádám híres képmásáról ismeri a büszke és méltóságos arcú, nemes tartású főurat. Ezt a portrét a XIX. század második felében, a Rákóczi-kultusz fénykorában a művészek több változatban is újrafestették. Ám fennmaradt számos korabeli festő ábrázolása. A kiállításon látható például Rákóczi rövid hajjal, bajusz nélkül is, nem csupán szemből, hanem profilból is megfestve. A pirospozsgás arc, fekete, csigás haj kevéssé idealizált képmásokon is fennmaradt. A podolini piaristák számára készült, 1703-as festményen kissé mereven, rövid hajjal és bajusszal örökítette meg a művész.
Az ország leghatalmasabb főnemeseként fogadta el Esze Tamás és talpasai hívását, hogy legyen a vezérük. Az 1703-ban írt brezáni kiáltványban a lakossághoz fordult, és fegyverbe szólított „minden nemest és nemtelent”, hogy „a törvénytelen és szenvedhetetlen iga alól” felszabadítsák Magyarországot. Tisztán látta, hogy helyzete és rangja mire kötelezi. „Egyedül az én személyem volt az, mely az én házam, az én őseim tekintélyénél fogva az egyformán gondolkodók szándékait egyesíteni tudta, és a külföld keresztény uralkodóinak baráti támogatását kieszközölte” – fogalmazta meg szerepét.
Rákóczi reánk maradt személyes tárgyai mellett meghatottan szemlélődhet a látogató. A sárospataki várból való mennyezetes ágy mellett zsebórája, a zborói kastélyból származó karosszéke, címeres pecsétnyomója is látható. A kiállítás metszetek, térképek, csatajelenetek segítségével idézi a szabadságharc kezdeti sikereit. A kuruc hadvezérek, Bercsényi, Pekry, Vay képmásai mellett a harci jeleneteken kuruc közlegények és császári erők csapnak össze. A jórészt könnyűlovasokból és gyalogosokból álló hadsereg fegyverei, a szablya, a hegyes tőr, a lóra való pallos ott sorakoznak a tárlókban. Sokkal komolyabb felszerelést használt a császári sereg: a tüzérségi kanóctartó, a szablya, a keréklakatos elsütőszerkezettel ellátott fegyver, a dragonyoskard, a puskaszurony csőbe dugható nyéllel, a pattantyús készlet, a kartács legyőzte a lőfegyverekkel nem eléggé felfegyverzett felkelőket. A szövetségesnek ígérkező XIV. Lajos francia király és I. Péter orosz cár levelei jelzik a megváltozott nemzetközi helyzetet.
Az 1708-as trencséni vereség után Rákóczi és a kuruc állam magára maradt, a katonák szétszéledtek, a hadsereg szétesett. A fejedelem verette, „Pro Libertate” feliratú rézpénzek, polturák, ezüstforintok, dukátok mellé kitett vörös-fehér csíkozású fejedelmi ezredzászló felirata sokáig lelkesítette a kurucokat: „Az igaz ügyet Isten nem hagyja el.” Az 1711-es szatmári békekötés után Rákóczi emigrációba vonult.
Száműzetésének végső színhelye Rodostó lett, ahol a bujdosók kis csapatával élt. Itt írta a szabadságharc eseményeit megörökítő emlékiratait, és kis asztalosműhelyében bútorokat esztergált. Ahogy íródeákja, Mikes Kelemen lejegyezte, „az ő gyönyörű szakálla sokszor tele forgáccsal”. A kiállításon látható tárgyak közt a maga faragta festett, virágdíszes karosszék emlékeztet a fejedelem törökországi éveire. Az 1735-ben meghalt Rákóczit vörös bársonypalástban temették el. Halotti ruhája és hamvai 1906-ban hazatértek: pompázatos dísztemetés után a kassai dóm kriptájában helyezték végső nyugalomra. Emléke évszázadokon át elevenen élt a magyar köztudatban a nemzeti összefogás jelképeként.

 <  home top  /\ 


Design & Content © 1993 Hungarian Online Resources - HunOR -, formerly known as UMCP Hungarian American Student Association
Fotóink, írásaink és grafikáink szerzôi jogvédelem alatt állnak © 1993 Amerikai Magyar Szôvetség: Magyar Online Forrás