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2017 December 17 (Vasárnap) - Lázár, Olimpia névnapja Search for: in

Content of this page:
    Blood on the streets of Budapest - Police protect an illegitimate excommunist government
    Hungary: 100,000 Protesters Attacked by Police
    Hungary: Police Breaks Up Peaceful Demonstration
    Police had used excessive force to break up the protests
    Hungary: "Battle" Forming At Budapest Bridge
    '06 Revolution Has Begun

Blood on the streets of Budapest - Police protect an illegitimate excommunist government

Protesters even seized a tank during Monday's protest
Protesters even seized a tank during Monday's protest

Hungarian cops clash with protesters
TEAR GAS, WATER CANNONS USED ON RIOTERS
By Pablo Gorondi
Associated Press
BUDAPEST, Hungary - Police fired rubber bullets, tear gas and water cannons to disperse thousands of anti-government protesters who later hijacked two unarmed tanks in violence that marred the 50th anniversary of Hungary's uprising against Soviet rule.

At least 40 people, including some police officers, were injured, rescue officials said. State news agency MTI reported that police beat some of the protesters -- including women and elderly people -- with rubber batons, and some had head injuries.

In one of the main showdowns Monday near Deak Square, the city's main subway hub, hundreds of officers behind three water cannons slowly advanced on a few hundred rioters. The protesters threw bottles and rocks at the police, who fired tear gas and rubber bullets back at them as a police helicopter circled low above the crowd.

Then one of the protesters seized a tank that was part of an exhibit in the square to commemorate the revolution. He drove it among the protesters until he was pulled out by police officers who rushed the vehicle. A second tank in the exhibit was pushed by the rioters toward the police.

The tanks were powerful symbols of the 1956 revolt. The night the uprising began, Red Army tanks rolled through the streets of Budapest and 12 days later, a blitz led by 4,500 Soviet tanks overran the country.

Most of the protesters were peacefully demanding to be allowed back to Kossuth Square outside parliament, where the main commemorations of the 1956 revolution were under way.

Anti-government protests began Sept. 17, when Socialist Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany was heard admitting on a leaked recording that the government had lied about the economy before winning re-election in April.

Monday, the protesters had gathered in different spots near the center of the city. Some had set up roadblocks with garbage cans and threw rocks at the police dressed in riot gear, who used tear gas and water cannons to disperse them near St. Stephen's Basilica.

At dawn, police had expelled several hundred protesters from Kossuth Square, where many had been camping for weeks, demanding the prime minister be dismissed. The government used the square for some of Monday's official memorial events.

The protesters had vowed to stay at Kossuth Square until Gyurcsany was dismissed, but police pushed them out of the square after they refused to submit to security checks. Authorities did not dismantle the dozens of tents and were expected to allow the demonstrators to return after Monday's events.

Late into Monday night, police were still trying to disperse crowds of protesters at various spots near the city center, firing hundreds of tear gas canisters and detaining several people.

Delegations from at least 56 countries were in Budapest for Monday's commemorations, including NATO Secretary-General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer and Spain's King Juan Carlos.

The 1956 student protests began on the afternoon of Oct. 23, and by nightfall had turned into an armed uprising. Around 2,800 Hungarians and 700 Soviet soldiers were killed in the Red Army offensive to crush the revolt, which was launched Nov. 4, 1956.

After the military defeat, strikes and protests continued for several weeks until a Soviet crackdown definitively ended the uprising in January 1957.

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Hungary: 100,000 Protesters Attacked by Police

police beat some of the protesters -- including women and elderly people
police beat some of the protesters -- including women and elderly people

Security forces began using tear gas grenades, water cannons and rubber bullets against the demonstrators.

The celebration of 50th anniversary of the 1956 Hungarian uprising against Soviet regime have evolved in protests against the ruling government in Hungary as thousands of protestors battled with police.

On Oct. 23, in the evening, security forces began using tear gas grenades, water cannons and rubber bullets against the demonstrators, who numbered in excess of 100,000 in front of Hungarian parliament in Budapest.

Hungary became part of the Soviet area of influence and was appropriated into a communist state following a short period of democracy in 1946-1947.

After 1948, Communist leader Mátyás Rákosi established a Stalinist rule in Hungary, which was hardly bearable for the war-torn country.

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Hungary: Police Breaks Up Peaceful Demonstration

Tear gas, rubber bullets and water canons were fired in the centre of Budapest during a national holiday.
Hungarian police was sent to forcefully break up a peaceful demonstration in front of parliament that gathered on the 50th anniversary of the country's revolt against Soviet regime.

The government and the police wanted to clear the square in front of parliament so that state ceremonies commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution and featuring dignitaries from several countries could go as planned.

A local news agency reported tear gas, rubber bullets and water canons were fired in the centre of Budapest, injuring several people.

Although the protesters promised that they wouldn't disturb the official ceremonies they fought back by seizing a tank which was on exhibit for the anniversary.

The anti-government protests in Hungary were triggered by a leaked speech from Socialist Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany who admitted to lying to the public "day and night" in order to win national elections.

The 1956 revolution is a public holiday in Hungary. Most people in the Eastern European country regard this day as the finest moment of their history, BBC notes.

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Police had used excessive force to break up the protests

Violence Mars Anniversary of '56 Revolt in Hungary
Violence Mars Anniversary of '56 Revolt in Hungary

Hungary foes clash over protests
Hungary's PM said the protesters were 'terrorising' Budapest
Scenes in Budapest
Hungary's prime minister and its main opposition party have clashed over violent protests that disrupted the anniversary of the 1956 uprising.
PM Ferenc Gyurcsany has refused calls to resign, describing anti-government protesters as an "aggressive minority".

But the leader of the main opposition Fidesz party said the whole country was against his "illegitimate government".

Some 100 people were hurt as protesters and riot police armed with tear gas and rubber bullets clashed in Budapest.

Opposition to PM Ferenc Gyurcsany turned violent last month after he admitted lying to win re-election.

Clashes continued late into the night on Monday and the mood in the capital remained tense.

By the end of the day, the number of protesters had fallen from several thousand to a few hundred, mostly concentrated on the Elizabeth Bridge over the River Danube.

Many of the protesters were from hard-right groups and some carried the red-and-white striped flag of the Hungarian government that supported the Nazis during World War II.

A group of demonstrators briefly commandeered a tank taken from an exhibition marking the 1956 anti-Soviet uprising.

'Illegitimate government'

Mr Gyurcsany said the protesters were an "aggressive minority... terrorising us".


The Hungarian flag was paraded before international dignitaries


"We have to defend the country," he said.

The Fidesz party said the police had used excessive force to break up the protests.

The party's leader, Viktor Orban, a former prime minister, told a gathering of his supporters that "an entire country has turned against this illegitimate government".

Earlier in the day, Hungarian officials and foreign dignitaries gathered at the parliament building to lay flowers.

Some veterans of the 1956 uprising refused to shake hands with Mr Gyurcsany at the commemoration and the main opposition Fidesz party said it was boycotting events where he would speak.

The Fidesz party has long refused to mark the 1956 uprising with Mr Gyurcsany's Socialists, whom it accuses of inheriting the mantle of the pro-Soviet Communists.


'Free Hungary'

Mr Gyurcsany caused political uproar recently when he admitted he had lied to the public about the economy.

But he has denied any comparison between Monday's protests and their 1956 counterparts.

"The majority of Hungarians believe that parliamentary democracy is the most suited to express people's will and to create law and give a programme to a free Hungary," he said.

The Hungarian uprising started in Budapest on 23 October 1956, with a spontaneous demonstration by a crowd of about 23,000, the reading of a pro-democracy manifesto and the singing of banned national songs.

A giant statue of Stalin was pulled down, leaving only the dictator's boots on the pedestal.

Soviet tanks were forced to withdraw, but returned with devastating force a week later.

The BBC's Allan Little says the uprising was the moment the world accepted the post-war partition of Europe and the apparent permanence of what Winston Churchill had called "the Iron Curtain".

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Hungary: "Battle" Forming At Budapest Bridge

Amnesty International condemns police brutality
Amnesty International condemns police brutality

Hungary: Police fire on protesters during McAleese visit
23/10/2006 - 16:41:40

Police have fired rubber bullets at anti-government protesters today, as Hungary commemorated the 50th anniversary of its anti-Soviet uprising.

President Mary McAleese is in Hungary today for commemorations to mark the 50th anniversary of the country's 1956 uprising against communism.

Mrs McAleese will join other international dignitaries at a ceremony to remember those who died when the nationwide rebellion against Soviet rule was brutally suppressed.

An Associated Press speaking on the fracas today photographer said one protester was hit in the head by a rubber bullet and was bleeding, but still conscious.

Authorities also fired water cannon and tear gas to disperse the crowds.

Protests on Kossuth Square outside parliament started on September 17, when a recording was leaked revealing socialist prime minister Ferenc Gyurcsany admitting that the government lied about the economy before its re-election in April.

The protesters had vowed to stay until Gyurcsany was dismissed, but police pushed them off the square after they refused to submit to security checks.

However, authorities did not dismantle the dozens of tents set up by the protesters, and were expected to allow the demonstrators to return after today’s events.

As the commemoration events began, state news wire MTI said police beat some of the protesters – including women and elderly people – with rubber batons, leaving some with head injuries.

By late afternoon, protesters began gathering in different spots near the centre of the city.

A few hundred protesters set up road blocks with rubbish bins and threw rocks at the police dressed in riot gear, who used large amounts of tear gas and several water cannon to disperse them on Bajcsy-Zsilinszky Road, near St. Stephen's Basilica.

At the same time, Fidesz-Hungarian Civic Union, the main centre-right opposition group, was holding their own 1956 commemoration just a few blocks away. According to MTI, over 100,000 people were at the rally.

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'06 Revolution Has Begun

Pro-government police chiefs order firing into the crowds
Pro-government police chiefs order firing into the crowds

Clashes as Hungary remembers 1956
Police in Hungary have fired tear gas on crowds of about 1,000 demonstrators during the 50th anniversary of the country's revolt against Soviet rule.
The local MTI news agency said tear gas was used outside parliament, where local and foreign officials had laid flowers to commemorate the revolt.

Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany has faced bitter opposition after admitting that he lied to win re-election.

Some veterans of the 1956 uprising refused to shake hands with him.

MTI reported that tear gas was also used at Budapest's Western Railway Station and that water cannon was used at another location.

The agency said that the protesters had been throwing stones and pieces of metal at security forces.

A Reuters cameraman said 20 tear-gas canisters had been fired, along with rubber bullets.

Police had earlier broken up angry protests ahead of formal ceremonies to mark the 1956 uprising and cleared hundreds of protesters from Hero's Square in the city centre.

Protesters have been present outside parliament for weeks.

President Laszlo Solyom has appealed for national unity.

He said the entire nation shared the demand for Hungarian independence during the uprising, which was suppressed in a bloody intervention by Soviet forces.

Hungary police tackle protesters
Hungarian police are tackling the remnants of a group of violent protesters who disrupted celebrations marking the 1956 anti-Soviet uprising.
Tear gas and rubber bullets were used to quell anti-government protests in Budapest, where officials laid flowers to mark the uprising 50 years ago.

Some protesters commandeered a tank taken from an uprising exhibition.

Opposition to PM Ferenc Gyurcsany turned violent last month after he admitted lying to win re-election.

Some veterans of the 1956 uprising refused to shake hands with him at Monday's commemoration and the main opposition Fidesz party said it was boycotting events where he would speak.

Mr Gyurcsany caused political uproar recently when he admitted he had lied to the public about the economy.

But he denied any comparison between Monday's protests and their 1956 counterparts.

"The majority of Hungarians believe that parliamentary democracy is the most suited to express people's will and to create law and give a programme to a free Hungary," he said.


Clashes

By the end of Monday, the number of protesters had dwindled from several thousand to a few hundred, most of them barricaded around Budapest's Elizabeth Bridge.

The BBC's Nick Thorpe in Budapest said long lines of riot police had moved down the streets, firing rubber bullets into crowds.

Our correspondent said he saw one man being carried away with what looked like a head wound from a rubber bullet.


The Hungarian flag was paraded before international dignitaries
The day's disturbances took place on the edge of a much bigger, peaceful demonstration, he said, adding that the picture in Budapest was confusing with several groups marching through the city to events at different locations.

It was difficult to tell whether the groups carrying Hungarian flags were marking 1956 or taking part in anti-government protests, our correspondent said.

In one incident, police rushed to stop an unarmed tank - similar to one used by the Soviets to quash the rebellion - that was being driven among the protesters. At least one man was pulled from the tank.

The agency said the protesters had been throwing rocks and pieces of metal at security forces.

Protesters have been present outside parliament for weeks, but were forced back in the early hours of Monday to make way for the official ceremonies.

President Laszlo Solyom has appealed for national unity.

Boycott

Monday's events began with dignitaries taking turns to place white roses at the black marble monument to the uprising outside parliament, before heading inside to adopt a declaration of freedom.


The Hungarian uprising started in Budapest on 23 October 1956, with a spontaneous demonstration by a crowd of about 23,000, the reading of a pro-democracy manifesto and the singing of banned national songs.

A giant statue of Stalin was pulled down, leaving only the dictator's boots on the pedestal.

Soviet tanks were forced to withdraw, but returned with devastating force a week later.


The BBC's Allan Little says the uprising was the moment the world accepted the post-war partition of Europe and the apparent permanence of what Winston Churchill had called "the Iron Curtain".

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